Poetry

Inaiane / Now By Vaughan Rapatahana

Besides the translations which always make poems highly original, this is a very inventive book of poetry! It’s always quite the feat when a poet can write in more than one language, but Rapatahana takes it one step further giving the reader such an original experience with his verses.

Amani By Rais Neza Boneza

Amani By Rais Neza Boneza

“Amani” means peace in Swahili. And these poems in this new collection by Boneza intend to do simply that. From the poem “Amani, my peace”: “Amani is calm like the moon.” The poems, too, are calming.

widewide.world to unwind By Joe Bisicchia

widewide.world to unwind By Joe Bisicchia

These poems are emotional and surreal. They seem to take on a resonance of their own. Bisicchia writes with a figurative use of language, but yet you can tell exactly what he may mean.

The Sound of Blossom Falling By Vincent Berquez

The Sound of Blossom Falling By Vincent Berquez

He definitely deliverBerquez cleverly divides this new poetry collection into three sections: Me, Us, and Them. That alone makes a powerful statement.s opening his book with this poem “A walk on Hilly Fields with my dog, Kenny” which is about a young child watching his dog be attacked and what he does to try and save it. It’s easy to imagine being there with this young boy, and also wanting to reach out and help him when the owner of the attacking dog does nothing. It’s clever to tell a story within a poem.

Images By Michael Escoubas

Images By Michael Escoubas

Besides the uniqueness of ekphrastic poems from the outset, this new collection of poems by Michael Escoubas is also quite original as it is a companion book to Sharmagne Leland St.-John’s own poetry book of the same name. They used the same images and the same title for each of their books. Leland St. John is Publisher and Editor-in-Chief and Escoubas is Editor and Book Reviewer for “Scribe and Quill.”

Underneath my American Face by  By M.L. Liebler

Underneath my American Face by By M.L. Liebler

This new poetry collection by M.L. Liebler is a decade worth of poetry starting in the 70’s and going to the present which makes it a very unique overall work from the start.

Call Me Snake By William Heyen

Call Me Snake By William Heyen

“Call Me Snake” is separated into three different sections. They are “Competition,” “Romance” and “The Football Corporations.” I’m always one that reads the Table of Contents (TOC) to see what’s in store for me as a reader. Unique and I can’t wait to see what he does with this are two thoughts that come to mind with this new collection by Heyen.

The Music of this Ruin By Patricia Barone

The Music of this Ruin By Patricia Barone

This new collection of poetry by Patricia Barone is divided into three sections: The Aviary, The Listeners, and The Glorified Body. The opening poem sets the tone for each section.

Sipping Tea & Bullfrog Songs By Baidha Dominique Fercoq

Sipping Tea & Bullfrog Songs By Baidha Dominique Fercoq

There are 9 sections in this recent poetry collection by Fercoq. The book is a mixture of prose and poems. The prose and poetry compliment each other and often flow from one to the other in a seamless fluid presentation.

Footsteps in the Garden by Bob MacKenzie

Footsteps in the Garden by Bob MacKenzie

Bob MacKenzie starts off his new poetry book with these lines: “in battered stetson and old jeans /he recalls the time of legends” from the poem “an american dream.” His use of sparse language gives you just what you need just like this poem lets you know his style of writing poems right up front.